Considering how academics have evolved, with new subjects being introduced often, choosing university courses can be overwhelming. Even after you’ve chosen your degree, the decision-making isn’t over. In addition to mandatory courses, you can also choose electives. It’s easy to get stuck between different courses because there are so many excellent options out there that all look interesting, would suit your degree, or simply because they look good.

While it’s great that you have so many different university courses to choose from, it can get confusing, and you can feel like there’s too much variety available. This article will help you tackle the issue by discussing the factors you should consider when choosing between different university courses.

Don’t have much time to read? Watch this short video instead–

Research

You can’t make an informed decision without considering all the factors. Before choosing one course over the other, it’s always helpful to research the courses and look at the pros and cons of each course. Sometimes simply thoroughly looking into a course makes you realise that you may prefer aspects of another one.

Subject Enjoyment and Interest

The key to choosing between university courses is picking a course that you’re genuinely interested in. If you don’t enjoy the course and only take it because it will look good on your transcript or because it seems impressive, you likely won’t put in the effort required to get a good grade. Studying something you dislike or find boring ensures that you don’t get the most out of your studies.

Transferable Skills and Career Prospects

If you’re studying for a specific degree, you probably have some idea of the career you want or the field you want to enter. You can choose between university courses by keeping your future career in mind and determine which one to opt for, depending on which has more transferable skills or better value for a future employer. For example, if you’re looking to get into game design, then a university course on coding and design will be more valuable in the future than one on British history.

Eligibility and Prerequisites

It’s also essential to keep eligibility in mind. Some university courses require prerequisites, and you cannot take them without having taken an introductory course. If you’re choosing between a course that doesn’t require a prerequisite and one that does, your choice will change drastically. Some courses may interest you enough to take the prerequisite and then the actual course, while others may not. If you’re looking for electives with no prerequisites or eligibility requirements, then either one of those can help you eliminate courses.

Availability and Clashes

If you’re in your first year, there are some mandatory courses you have to take. These may clash with electives. Before worrying about choosing between university courses, make sure they’re available and don’t clash with your existing courses. If you’re especially interested in one course, you may have to drop another or take it the following semester, depending on availability and your schedule.

Advisor’s Input

Most universities assign you advisors who are there to help you make these decisions. If you have an academic advisor, visit them before registration and ask for their advice on which university courses you should take. Come prepared with a list of questions you can ask them. If you need detailed answers they cannot provide, you can always email the professors you’re planning on taking the classes from.

Student Experiences

Another useful tip on picking university courses is by talking to those who have already taken the course you’re looking into. You can either ask students you know have taken the course, check online forums, or use social media to contact past students. Their experience can help you determine whether the course is right for you or not. Questions to ask include whether they’re enjoying the course, what the workload is like, what they expected going into it, whether it lives up to those expectations, etc. Talking to people already taking the course or those who have taken it in the past will help you understand what exactly you’re deciding between.

Course Content

Considerations-when-comparing-different-university-courses

Course content and syllabi are usually available online on your university’s website. Go through the course content to see which course interests you more. For example, two courses may both be on psychological disorders, but one may focus on diagnosis and history while the other may focus on treatment. Checking out detailed course content will help you narrow down your choices.

Assessment

When it comes to choosing university courses, assessment is an important part of the equation. Of course, while gaining knowledge is an integral part of studying, how you’ll be tested on what you’ve learnt will affect your performance and transcript. Checking the course requirements and syllabus will help you discover how you’ll be graded.

For example, some courses have necessary presentations, and if you’re someone with social anxiety, you may not want to choose this option. Other classes may have a higher percentage devoted to research papers or written tests, which you may prefer.

Relevance to Degree

While this isn’t always a major factor, it is important to consider it. Is the course you’re looking at related to your overall degree? For example, if you’re studying for a psychology degree and you’re looking at a course on statistics and one on gender studies, the statistics course is the one that is more relevant to your degree.

Comparing different university (1)
Considerations When Comparing Different University Courses 4

However, this doesn’t always mean that you should choose the course that’s more related to your field. It depends on your priorities and interests. While a statistics course is more relevant to your psychology degree, you may opt for the gender studies course because you want to branch out, or it excites you. After all, that’s what elective courses are for.

Further Information:–

Conclusion

It’s important to remember that while choosing between different university courses is important. This is not a decision that will affect your entire university career. It’s easy to get stressed out about these decisions, but whichever course you choose will provide you with knowledge and skills that will benefit you in the future.

If you don’t like a course or prefer another one, you can always switch courses before the add/drop period ends or take another course the following semester.

January / february intake